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Exercises To Boost Vitamin D – Don’t Just Take a Supplement! The Best Workouts And Tips


Methodology

Vitamin D is vital for strong bones, immunity, mood, and protection against chronic diseases. Many people are deficient, especially with inadequate sun exposure. Certain exercises can boost vitamin D levels and address deficiency. Read on to learn about the best workouts for enhancing your body’s vitamin D status.

Boost Your Vitamin D Levels Through Exercise

Called the “sunshine vitamin”, vitamin D stimulates calcium absorption for proper bone mineralization and growth. It also regulates cell proliferation, immunity, inflammation, and gene expression.

Exercises To Boost Vitamin D

Low levels are associated with disorders like osteoporosis, autoimmunity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Our main source of vitamin D is production in the skin when exposed to UV sunlight. But many people don’t get enough sun exposure for adequate vitamin D synthesis.

Additionally, issues like obesity, digestive disorders, aging, and medications interfere with the absorption and activation of vitamin D from the diet.  

Strategic exercise helps increase vitamin D in multiple ways, providing a natural deficiency treatment option. Let’s discuss the mechanisms and best workouts for optimizing vitamin D status.

How Exercise Boosts Vitamin D Levels?

? Sun Exposure – Exercising outdoors in the sun triggers vitamin D synthesis from UV radiation.

? Circulation – Aerobic activity stimulates circulation, transporting vitamin D metabolites to target tissues.

? Gene Expression – Exercise may induce gene activity that enhances vitamin D receptor mechanisms. 

? Inflammation – Exercise lowers inflammatory cytokines that hinder vitamin D activation.

? Weight Loss Reducing body fat percentage improves bioavailability and vitamin D absorption.

Best Exercises For Vitamin D

1. Outdoors Sun Exposure

Walking, hiking, jogging and any outdoor cardio exercise generates vitamin D during daylight hours. Early mornings and late afternoons are best. Expose skin without sunscreen.

2. Strength Training 

Weight lifting and resistance bands maintain muscle and bone mass optimized by vitamin D. As little as 8 weeks of strength training boost levels. Use high rep, moderate weight routines.

3. Yoga

Even indoor yoga boosts vitamin D. Downward dog, warrior poses, and backbends maximize surface skin exposure. Try hot yoga for extra sweat and circulation benefits. 

4. High-Intensity Interval Training

Short bursts of maximum effort activity like sprints, bike intervals, and battle rope work spike circulation and burn subcutaneous fat for better vitamin D mobilization.

5. Jumping Rope 

This high-impact cardio activity burns fat, engages muscles, and stimulates circulation for improved vitamin D status from interval training.

6. Optimizing Benefits

Here are some extra tips for maximizing the vitamin D benefits of your workouts:

➜ Exercise in the early morning or late afternoon for prime UV exposure

➜ Perform outdoor workouts in shorts and tank tops when possible 

➜ Add short sprints to walking or jogging intervals 

➜ Include basic jumps, hops, or skipping to engage bones and muscles

➜ Time strength training and yoga routines when some UV sunlight comes through windows 

➜ Stay hydrated and recover properly between high-intensity sessions

➜ Get tested to monitor vitamin D levels and adjust intake if needed

7. Preventing Deficiency

Daily exercise and adequate sun exposure minimize the risk of vitamin D deficiency. But levels can also be raised safely with vitamin D supplements when necessary.

➜ To maintain robust vitamin D status through exercise:

➜ Spend 15-30 minutes outside during peak sunlight hours multiple days per week

➜ Engage in a mixture of cardio, strength training, and impact exercises

➜ Consume foods rich in vitamin D like fatty fish, cod liver oil, fortified dairy, and eggs

➜ Take supplemental vitamin D3 if your levels are below 30 ng/mL without other medical conditions  

Conclusion

A strategic exercise regimen incorporating outdoor activity, strength training, and high-intensity workouts promotes healthy vitamin D levels – a key player in bone health, immunity, and disease prevention.

Boosting vitamin D through natural mechanisms like judicious sun exposure and circulation enhances exercise benefits further by optimizing muscular function and recovery. Talk to your doctor about safe sun exposure and optimal vitamin D intake.

FAQs

1. How much exercise is needed to increase vitamin D? 

Aim for 15-30 minutes of outdoor cardio like walking or jogging 2-3 times per week along with regular strength training to maintain healthy vitamin D levels through exercise.

2. Should you take vitamin D on days you exercise?

Yes, taking a vitamin D supplement with fat for absorption on workout days provides added support on top of exercise benefits. Avoid extremely high doses without medical guidance.

3. Does walking increase vitamin D?

Yes, outdoor walking exposes skin to UV radiation which stimulates natural vitamin D synthesis. Even window sunlight exposure while exercising indoors may provide small benefits.

4. Do you need sunscreen while exercising for vitamin D?

Limiting sunscreen allows vitamin D production during short outdoor exercise sessions. Take caution against burning without sun protection during prolonged exposure

5. Can you get too much vitamin D from exercising?

Its unlikely excessive vitamin D would result from sun exposure through regular outdoor exercise alone. Those taking high supplemental doses should have levels monitored.

Dr. Harold Gojiberry is not just your ordinary General Practitioner; he is a compassionate healthcare provider with a deep commitment to patient well-being and a passion for literature. With extensive medical knowledge and experience, Dr. Gojiberry has made a significant impact in the field of healthcare, particularly in the area of liver diseases and viral hepatitis.

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